SPORTS MEDICINE  ·  SURGERY OF THE KNEE  ·  SURGERY OF THE SHOULDER  

Posterior Subluxation Print

Recurrent posterior subluxation is the most common form of posterior instability. Patients with recurrent posterior instability usually have a history of repetitive use rather than a specific traumatic injury. 

Often, these patients are unaware that the shoulder is actually slipping out of place. Instead, they present because of pain with certain activities. In particular, weight lifters may experience pain during the bench press and offensive lineman may have pain when they place their arms in front of their body in football.

Most patients with recurrent posterior subluxation respond well to an aggressive rehabilitation program which emphasizes strengthening of the rotator cuff. In a small minority of patients, surgical treatment may be required. Because of the rarity of posterior instability, most experts recommend that these patients be referred to an orthopaedic surgeon with special expertise in shoulder surgery. After surgery for posterior instability, a brace is usually necessary for at least four weeks after surgery. The results of surgical treatment for posterior instability have historically not been as good as though for anterior instability. However, recent techniques have provided several studies showing 80 to 90% good or excellent results in these patients.

 

 

Posterior Subluxation, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 6A

Figure A shows an arthroscopic view of a torn posterior labrum.

 

 

Posterior Subluxation, Dr. Allen F. Anderson, Nashville, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Figure 6B

Figure B shows repair of the labrum with arthroscopic anchors

 

 

 
© Allen F. Anderson, M.D. 2017